2018
AT A GLANCE

Despite their unique talents and
abilities, people with disabilities still
remain unemployed at a much higher
rate compared to those without.

2018 AT A GLANCE


Despite their unique talents and abilities, people with disabilities still remain unemployed at a much higher rate compared to those without.
WHO WE ARE

Since 1963, the Department of Rehabilitation has believed in the talent and potential of individuals with disabilities. We meet our program participants where they are in life and provide training and support to meet their individual needs. Working closely with local service providers and businesses, our program participants gain skills and abilities to help live, work, shop, and play where they choose.

1,800

Public Servants

86

Offices

OUR IMPACT

The primary program administered by DOR is the Vocational Rehabilitation program. This program provides a wide range of services designed to assist individuals with disabilities prepare for and engage in meaningful employment consistent with their strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests, and informed choice.

101,750

Total Participants

FUNDING SOURCES
(In Thousands, State Fiscal Year 17-18)
 
$374,049

Federal Funds

$64,604

State Funds

$7,349

Reimbursements

$2,361

Vending Stand Fund

$1,114

Traumatic Brain Injury Fund

 
$449,477
Total
DEMOGRAPHICS
(Vocational Rehabilitation Program Only)
Bar Chart for Primary Disabilities. Psychiatric, 25.7%, Learning, 19.7%, Physical, 16.9%, Intellectual, 13%, Cognative, 7.1%, Deaf, 5.7%, Other, 5.4%, Blind, 4.7%, Traumatic Brain Injury, 1.1%
Bar Chart for Ethnicity and Race. Hispanic, 38.3%, White, 35.6%, Black, 15.7%, Asian, 5.2%, Multi, 3%, American indian, 0.9%, Other, 0.8%, Pacific Islander, 0.3%
Bar Chart for Age. 16 to 21, 31.3%, 22 to 29, 20.4%, 30 to 39, 15%, 50-59, 14.1%, 40-49, 12.6%, 60 plus, 6.4%, 15 or younger, 0.1%
DOR STUDENT SERVICES

We expanded our commitment to students with disabilities aged 16-20 statewide by providing and promoting access to career exploration, post-secondary counseling, work skills, and self-advocacy training as well as work based learning. Pre-Employment Transition Services are provided in partnership with education and workforce partners to increase the successful transition of students with disabilities into the workforce.

 
Alex, a high school senior in DOR's Student Services Program has his sights set on becoming a biochemist. Alex received assistance with resume building, interview skills training, and social skills development. He is currently employed in a work based learning program to earn income to purchase a computer for college.
 
16,765

Students Served

OUR STATE AND LOCAL PROGRAM PARTNERS

DOR collaborated and engaged partners from education, business, workforce, and community at all levels, to leverage the needed resources to collectlively serve our participants effectively.

OUR BUSINESS PARTNERS
10,470
DOR participants hired
6,000+
Businesses partnered with
DOR to hire individuals
with disabilities
62,912
Jobs posted to
DOR Hot Jobs
in collaboration with businesses
+6%
Average participant
hourly wage increase
PARTICIPANT OCCUPATIONS

DOR has been successful in assisting participants with job placement in a variety of categories.

 

Clerical and Administrative

Sales and Retail

Education

Agricultural

Information and Technology

 
INDEPENDENT LIVING & COMMUNITY ACCESS SERVICES

DOR's Community Living Services network is dedicated to the idea that communities should be fully accessible and integrated to all persons with disabilities. Our community Living Services network includes: Independent Living, Assistive Technology, Traumatic Brain injury, Disability Access Service programs, and Older Individuals who are Blind . These programs serve California's people, businesses and public entities by providing education advocacy, and partnerships that transform the lives of people with disabilities in a variety of ways.

 
"There are very few people, even with the most severe disabilities, who can't take control of their own life. The problem is, the people around us don't expect us to."

Ed Roberts
Former DOR Director and pioneer of California's Independent Living Movement
 
28

Independent Living Centers

17,630

Californians Served

TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY

We provided federal grant funds to 7 Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) centers across the state. These centers assist TBI survivors integrate back into their community.

 
"When you're 30, or 40, or 50, or however old you are, becoming assimilated at that age is not easy because people automatically judge me - they say, as soon as they hear my speech impediment, which is obvious, I mean, it's right there. They think speech impediment? But if they hear my voice and what I have to say that will get wiped clear. So, I want to broaden the spectrum for TBI's, so that future TBI victims won't get the harsh hassle that I have gotten."

Ivonne Lauscher
 
893

Californians with TBI Served

3,647

Service Providers / Caregivers

NOTICE ABILITIES

Visit our blog where our participants tell their stories.

"As soon as I got that laptop and I was able to work, I worked eight hours a day - I loved it! Just being able to work helped me survive. I love my job!"

Jerri Schlachter
 
"I experienced a lot of challenges both personal and academic. Coming into this program and then getting the support that I need to move forward allowed me to take advantage of opportunities that I may not have had the ability to do on my own."

Charles Lea