2019
AT A GLANCE

Despite their unique talents and
abilities, people with disabilities still
remain unemployed at a much higher
rate compared to those without.

2019 AT A GLANCE


Despite their unique talents and abilities, people with disabilities still remain unemployed at a much higher rate compared to those without.
WHO WE ARE

Since 1963, the Department of Rehabilitation has believed in the talent and potential of individuals with disabilities. We meet our program participants where they are in life and provide training and support to meet their individual needs. Working closely with local service providers and businesses, our program participants gain skills and abilities to help live, work, shop, and play where they choose.

1,777

Public Servants

85

Offices

OUR IMPACT

The primary program administered by DOR is the Vocational Rehabilitation program. This program provides a wide range of services designed to assist individuals with disabilities prepare for and engage in meaningful employment consistent with their strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests, and informed choice.

108,916

Total VR Participants

FUNDING SOURCES
(In Thousands, State Fiscal Year 18-19)
 
$387,664

Federal Funds

$66,314

State Funds

$7,529

Reimbursements

$2,620

Vending Stand Fund

$805

Traumatic Brain Injury Fund

 
$464,932
Total
DEMOGRAPHICS
(Vocational Rehabilitation Program Only)
Bar Chart for Primary Disabilities. Psychiatric, 23.3%, Not Reported, 18.1%, Learning, 14.8%, Physical, 14.7%, Intellectual, 12.3%, Cognative, 6.1%, Deaf, 5.2%, Blind, 4.5%, Traumatic Brain Injury, 1.0%
Bar Chart for Ethnicity and Race. Hispanic, 39.4%, White, 33.7%, Black, 14.7%, Asian, 5.3%, Multi, 3.4%, Not Reported, 2.1%, American indian, 0.9%, American Indian, 0.9%, Pacific Islander, 0.4%
Bar Chart for Age. 16 to 21, 38.7%, 22 to 29, 18.6%, 30 to 39, 13.6%, 50-59, 12%, 40-49, 11%, 60 plus, 6.1%, 15 or younger, 0.1%
DOR STUDENT SERVICES

We expanded our commitment to students with disabilities aged 16-20 statewide by providing and promoting access to career exploration, post-secondary counseling, work skills, and self-advocacy training as well as work based learning. Pre-Employment Transition Services are provided in partnership with education and workforce partners to increase the successful transition of students with disabilities into the workforce.

 
Woman smiling wearing green shirt and black jacket
Evelin Valladares attends East Los Angeles College within DOR's Student Services Program and is pursuing Child Development education. Her goal is to work as a Child Care Worker or Teacher's Aide in her coming future. Through DOR services, she has strengthened her job readiness, developed a functional resume, and obtained professional interview attire. She has now obtained a job offer to join Childcare Center Careers and is set to start working.
 
29,562

VR Students Served

OUR STATE AND LOCAL PROGRAM PARTNERS

DOR collaborated and engaged partners from education, business, workforce, and community at all levels, to leverage the needed resources to collectlively serve our participants effectively.

OUR BUSINESS PARTNERS
9,225
DOR participants hired
8,605
Businesses partnered with
DOR to hire individuals
with disabilities
74,000+
Jobs posted to
DOR Hot Jobs
in collaboration with businesses
+7.5%
Average participant
hourly wage increase
PARTICIPANT OCCUPATIONS

DOR has been successful in assisting participants with job placement in a variety of categories.

 

Clerical and Administrative

Sales and Retail

Education

Agricultural

Information and Technology

 
INDEPENDENT LIVING & COMMUNITY ACCESS SERVICES

DOR's Community Living Services network is dedicated to the idea that communities should be fully accessible and integrated to all persons with disabilities. Our community Living Services network includes: Independent Living, Assistive Technology, Traumatic Brain Injury, Disability Access Service programs, and Older Individuals Who Are Blind . These programs serve California's people, businesses and public entities by providing education advocacy, and partnerships that transform the lives of people with disabilities in a variety of ways.

 
"There are very few people, even with the most severe disabilities, who can't take control of their own life. The problem is, the people around us don't expect us to."

Ed Roberts
Former DOR Director and pioneer of California's Independent Living Movement
 
28

Independent Living Centers

20,599

Californians Served

TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY

We provided federal grant funds to 7 Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) centers across the state. These centers assist TBI survivors integrate back into their community.

 
Smiling man with long white hair and trimmed mustache and beard wearing a black shirt
"Working to heal after a brain injury isn't easy to do, and it isn't always a direct path, so that's why having a place that will stick by you is so important. The staff members don't give up because we don't give up. Jodi House is the only place that stuck by me after my accident and they helped me change my life."

Alan Turley
 
3,699

Professionals, Survivors, and Families
to attend Trainings and Seminars

459

Education Events for the Public

NOTICE ABILITIES

Visit our blog where our participants tell their stories.

man looking down wearing light blue shirt with pale yellow tie
"I always remember back then when the Department of Rehab helped me. You just got to give them your time and you've got to make a commitment."

Serafin Garcia
 
woman with white hair wearing a navy jacket over a black shirt
"You think about what you can do, not what you can't do. I've had to learn to forget about what I can't do and concentrate on what I can do. Now yes, I've got 21 inches of titanium and a hinge, but I can yeah, go out and play nine holes of golf."

Kati White